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folder 53 - 014

C-2

see or "see" exists but cannot; (2) what you + everyone else fundamentally believe about reality is erroneous. Something is there but you have up to now not been able to see it. Why is that? (Conversely, why can you see it now? But of course this is overshadowed by the question, what is this that you now see? It is world (defined as: all that exists: "Die Welt ist alles dass das Falls ist") but a different world, +, moreover, a different kind of world.
Its structural basis -that is, it constitutes a unity- on the basis of information. The components are not linked tangentially in terms of spatial juxtaposition but in some other yet absolutely real way ("space," in this other world, does not signify what it signifies for our world. if indeed it signifies anything or even exists - in fact it does not exist: the juxtaposition is one of arrangement conceptually meaningful, as in mathematics; that is, the Gestalt must be understood intelligibly by the rational/reasoning faculty of the percipient, not viewed sensibly, i.e. passively; the reasoning or cognitive faculty must operate actively, as, for example, when reading written words on a page. (This very clearly is my "groove to music" leap phenomenon). + this is precisely why a given object or event can play one role in our world + quite another in that world. In that world its role is one of pure function as part within one unitary integrated system: the part derives its identity, meaning, significance, + purpose from the total system, +, alone, signifies nothing at all. so in a sense this other world tells a dramatic story + in fact is a dramatic story. Although apparently geometric forms -spacial number, as it were- constitute the essence at the highest possible level. For example the absolutely fundamental numerical notational system -the 0-1 binary system- take the form of object at rest, object in motion (although "at rest" + "in motion" may pertain to time rather than space; still, the objects themselves occupy space: they are corporeal things -


Notes

The quote in German refers to the opening line of Ludwig Wittgenstein's "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus" i.e.: "Die Welt ist alles, was der Fall ist."